WORLD WAR III: Obama has signed 3 new executive orders: NDAA 2013: Now Featuring Propaganda And War With Iran | Tat's Revolution
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WORLD WAR III: Obama has signed 3 new executive orders: NDAA 2013: Now Featuring Propaganda And War With Iran

NDAA 2013: Now Featuring Propaganda And War With Iran

lionsofliberty.com
May 22, 2012

“What if the American people woke up, and understood that the official reasons for going to war are almost always based on lies and promoted by war propaganda in order to serve special interests?” – Congressman Ron Paul

Nary a week seems to go by around this here site where we don’t mention the insidious indefinite detention provisions of the 2012 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA), signed under the cover of New Year’s Eve by President Obama without as much as a whimper of dissent from the mainstream media.  We’ve been trying to counter that whimper with a constant roar of protest here at Lions of Liberty (did I just do a Lion metaphor? Oh yeah I did!).  There have certainly been some positive grassroots developments in battling the NDAA in the past half year or so.  Whether it’s the formation of grassroots groups such as P.A.N.D.A. (People Against National Defense Act), attempts by states to nullify indefinite detention, or the recent ruling of a Federal Judge blocking the indefinite detention provisions, it’s clear that resistance to this egregious violation of our natural rights is strong.

Just when we are starting to make some progress against the 2012 NDAA both in raising public awareness and measurable legal victories, those creepy Congress critters are already at it again, hard at work on the 2013 version of the NDAA.  The NDAA is an omnibus bill that comes up every year in order to fully fund the armed forces, including present military action abroad.  As with nearly every major bill, Congressman use the opportunity of such a large and important bill to sneak in all sorts of shady little provisions, knowing that almost everyone will vote for the final bill, or else face the heinous charge of not  “supporting the troops”.  Maybe it’s just me, but sending our troops across the globe to fight in multiple illegal, unsustainable wars while military suicides exceed combat deaths doesn’t sound like “supporting the troops”, but hey what do I know? I’m just some dude with a website and a passion for liberty.

Wouldn’t you know it, Congress has already gone and passed the first version of the 2013 NDAA, which includes all sorts of Tasty Tyranny Nuggets (consider this an official Copyright, in case I one day find myself hawking Tasty Tyranny Nuggets cereal on the black market in my local FEMA Camp.) As this latest version creeps it’s way through the Senate and eventually to the desk of the POTUS, let’s stop and take a look at a couple exciting new editions to this year’s bill.

1. An Amendment that would strike the current ban on “domestic dissemination” of propaganda by the State Department, essentially legalizing taxpayer funded war propaganda within the United States.  As if we weren’t subjected to enough war propaganda from our Cable News Profiteers Providers, with constant fear mongering and calls for war on Iran and just about anyone else that might look at us funny, this Amendment will cut out the middle man and allow the State Department to deliver its’ lies directly to us! Score one for efficient government. Speaking of war…

2. As Representative Dennis Kucinich has warned, the 2013 NDAA essentially authorizes a war against Iran. No wonder they need all that propaganda! In Section 1221, a “DECLARATION OF POLICY” towards Iran, declares that

       It shall be the policy of the United States to take all necessary measures, including military action if required, to prevent Iran from threatening the United States, its allies, or Iran’s neighbors with a nuclear weapon.

Not to be outdone, Section 1222, ” UNITED STATES MILITARY PREPAREDNESS IN THE MIDDLE EAST”, ramps it up with specifics:

A) pre-positioning sufficient supplies of aircraft, munitions, fuel, and other materials for both air- and sea-based missions at key forward locations in the Middle East and Indian Ocean;… (B) maintaining sufficient naval assets in the region necessary to signal United States resolve and to bolster United States capabilities to launch a sustained sea and air campaign against a range of Iranian nuclear and military targets.

It doesn’t get much clearer than that, now does it? Not only does the 2013 NDAA authorize war with Iran and fund the preparations for such a war, it even authorizes the propaganda needed to go with it, for what will surely be a hard sell to a war-weary American public.
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Expert More War Propaganda Like This…And Expect To Pay For It!

The one provision in the 2013 NDAA that, on the surface, looks like a positive is an amendment that supposedly reaffirms the right of habeas corpus , actually does nothing of the sort. The Gohmert amendment states that the NDAA does not

deny the writ of habeas corpus or deny any Constitutional rights for persons detained in the United States under the AUMF who are entitled to such rights.

You see that little trick there? You are entitled to habeas corpus rights, as long as you are entitled to them. However, sections 1021 and 1022 of the 2012 NDAA stripped those rights, and the 2013 version does nothing whatsoever to change that.  According to Steve Vladeck, of American University’s law school,

“[T]he Gohmert Amendment does nothing whatsoever to address the central objections…. [I]t merely provides by statute a remedy that is already available to individuals detained within the United States; and says nothing about the circumstances in which individuals might actually be subject to military detention when arrested within the territory of United States…. Anyone within the United States who was subject to military detention before the FY2013 NDAA would be subject to it afterwards, as well…”

There was one amendment offered that would have explicitly prohibited indefinite detention, the Amash-Smith Amendment, also co-sponsored by Ron Paul.  That was, of course, predictably shot down.

We can never relent in the fight against growing tyranny both at home and abroad.  The first step to solving problems on as grand a scale as the extraordinary powers granted by the 2012 and 2013 NDAAs is to make people aware that there is a problem in the first place . We know by  now that the revolution will not be televised, and nor will the tales of tyranny that necessitate it.

Help us restore the Bill of Rights. Help us stop a war. Help us spread the word on the NDAA.

Similar/Related Articles
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  1. Anonymous: Night Raid Firm Lobbied for NDAA, Donated $272K to Sen. Rob Portman
  2. Obama’s NDAA Signing Statement is Just Smoke & Mirrors
  3. Bill Introduced To Challenge Authority Of NDAA
  4. Obama signs phony ‘Policy Directive’ claiming NDAA indefinite detention provision does not apply to US citizens
  5. Virginia House Passes NDAA Nullification 96-4
  6. Virginia will not cooperate with NDAA detention
  7. Judge Blocks Portion of NDAA
  8. Obama Signs Martial Law Bill: NDAA Now Law
  9. Is the NDAA illegal?
  10. How Congress is Signing Its Own Arrest Warrants in the NDAA Citizen Arrest Bill
  11. Ron Paul: The NDAA Repeals More Rights
  12. Don’t Mute Humanity: NDAA’s War on Americans & Bill of Rights

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Obama has signed 3 new executive orders: www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2012/05/01/executive-order-promoting-international-regulatory-cooperation
and

www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2012/05/10/executive-order-identifying-and-reducing-regulatory-burdens

and

www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2012/03/15/executive-order-establishing-white-house-council-strong-cities-strong-co

This latest executive order will allow the soviet socialists in our local communities through their committees to adopt and enact United Nations regulations designed to establish absolute United Nations’ control over our every resource. The laws of the United States, individual states, counties, cities, and local municipalities, under our Constitution must be legislated. These executive ordersbypass the legislative process and essentially nullify our representative form of government under the guise of allowing us to voice our opinion in reference to new regulation rather than enforce our will through elected representation. If one examines these three executive orders closely, Obama’s agenda becomes clear. The international socialists, known as the United Nations, are worming their way into our political system at every level. Through the local socialist committees that will be assembled, local commissars will be elected.

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These commissars, working in coalition with state and local agencies and sovereign nations/Indian Tribes, will attempt to initiate UN dictatorship over our lands, both private and public. And through regulation of the land, they will attempt to establish dictatorial control over the actions of we the people.

This is a sneak attack and it will not be publicized in the mainstream media. You will know these words are true when you see the soviet socialists in your area seizing control over your public and private lands using regulatory powers derived directly from the United Nations Agenda 21.

www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2012/05/01/executive-order-promoting-international-regula

www.whitehouse.gov

EXECUTIVE ORDER
– – – – – – –
PROMOTING INTERNATIONAL REGULATORY COOPERATION

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, and in order to promote international regulatory cooperation, it is hereby ordered as follows:

Section 1. Policy. Executive Order 13563 of January 18, 2011 (Improving Regulation and Regulatory Review), states that our regulatory system must protect public health, welfare, safety, and our environment while promoting economic growth, innovation, competitiveness, and job creation. In an increasingly global economy, international regulatory cooperation, consistent with domestic law and prerogatives and U.S. trade policy, can be an important means of promoting the goals of Executive Order 13563.

The regulatory approaches taken by foreign governments may differ from those taken by U.S. regulatory agencies to address similar issues. In some cases, the differences between the regulatory approaches of U.S. agencies and those of their foreign counterparts might not be necessary and might impair the ability of American businesses to export and compete internationally. In meeting shared challenges involving health, safety, labor, security, environmental, and other issues, international regulatory cooperation can identify approaches that are at least as protective as those that are or would be adopted in the absence of such cooperation. International regulatory cooperation can also reduce, eliminate, or prevent unnecessary differences in regulatory requirements.

Sec. 2. Coordination of International Regulatory Cooperation. (a) The Regulatory Working Group (Working Group) established by Executive Order 12866 of September 30, 1993 (Regulatory Planning and Review), which was reaffirmed by Executive Order 13563, shall, as appropriate:
(i) serve as a forum to discuss, coordinate, and develop a common understanding among agencies of U.S. Government positions and priorities with respect to:
(A) international regulatory cooperation activities that are reasonably anticipated to lead to significant regulatory actions;
(B) efforts across the Federal Government to support significant, cross-cutting international regulatory cooperation activities, such as the work of regulatory cooperation councils; and

(C) the promotion of good regulatory practices internationally, as well as the promotion of U.S. regulatory approaches, as appropriate; and

(ii) examine, among other things:

(A) appropriate strategies for engaging in the development of regulatory approaches through international regulatory cooperation, particularly in emerging technology areas, when consistent with section 1 of this order;

(B) best practices for international regulatory cooperation with respect to regulatory development, and, where appropriate, information exchange and other regulatory tools; and

(C) factors that agencies should take into account when determining whether and how to consider other regulatory approaches under section 3(d) of this order.

(b) As Chair of the Working Group, the Administrator of the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (OIRA) of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) shall convene the Working Group as necessary to discuss international regulatory cooperation issues as described above, and the Working Group shall include a representative from the Office of the United States Trade Representative and, as appropriate, representatives from other agencies and offices.

(c) The activities of the Working Group, consistent with law, shall not duplicate the efforts of existing interagency bodies and coordination mechanisms. The Working Group shall consult with existing interagency bodies when appropriate.

(d) To inform its discussions, and pursuant to section 4 of Executive Order 12866, the Working Group may commission analytical reports and studies by OIRA, the Administrative Conference of the United States, or any other relevant agency, and the Administrator of OIRA may solicit input, from time to time, from representatives of business, nongovernmental organizations, and the public.

(e) The Working Group shall develop and issue guidelines on the applicability and implementation of sections 2 through 4 of this order.

(f) For purposes of this order, the Working Group shall operate by consensus.

Sec. 3. Responsibilities of Federal Agencies. To the extent permitted by law, and consistent with the principles and requirements of Executive Order 13563 and Executive Order 12866, each agency shall:

(a) if required to submit a Regulatory Plan pursuant to Executive Order 12866, include in that plan a summary of its international regulatory cooperation activities that are reasonably anticipated to lead to significant regulations, with an explanation of how these activities advance the purposes of Executive Order 13563 and this order;

(b) ensure that significant regulations that the agency identifies as having significant international impacts are designated as such in the Unified Agenda of Federal Regulatory and Deregulatory Actions, on RegInfo.gov, and on Regulations.gov;

(c) in selecting which regulations to include in its retrospective review plan, as required by Executive Order 13563, consider:

(i) reforms to existing significant regulations that address unnecessary differences in regulatory requirements between the United States and its major trading partners, consistent with section 1 of this order, when stakeholders provide adequate information to the agency establishing that the differences are unnecessary; and

(ii) such reforms in other circumstances as the agency deems appropriate; and

(d) for significant regulations that the agency identifies as having significant international impacts, consider, to the extent feasible, appropriate, and consistent with law, any regulatory approaches by a foreign government that the United States has agreed to consider under a regulatory cooperation council work plan.

Sec. 4. Definitions. For purposes of this order:

(a) “Agency” means any authority of the United States that is an “agency” under 44 U.S.C. 3502(1), other than those considered to be independent regulatory agencies, as defined in 44 U.S.C. 3502(5).

(b) “International impact” is a direct effect that a proposed or final regulation is expected to have on international trade and investment, or that otherwise may be of significant interest to the trading partners of the United States.

(c) “International regulatory cooperation” refers to a bilateral, regional, or multilateral process, other than processes that are covered by section 6(a)(ii), (iii), and (v) of this order, in which national governments engage in various forms of collaboration and communication with respect to regulations, in particular a process that is reasonably anticipated to lead to the development of significant regulations.

(d) “Regulation” shall have the same meaning as “regulation” or “rule” in section 3(d) of Executive Order 12866.

(e) “Significant regulation” is a proposed or final regulation that constitutes a significant regulatory action.

(f) “Significant regulatory action” shall have the same meaning as in section 3(f) of Executive Order 12866.

Sec. 5. Independent Agencies. Independent regulatory agencies are encouraged to comply with the provisions of this order.

Sec. 6. General Provisions. (a) Nothing in this order shall be construed to impair or otherwise affect:

(i) the authority granted by law to a department or agency, or the head thereof;

(ii) the coordination and development of international trade policy and negotiations pursuant to section 411 of the Trade Agreements Act of 1979 (19 U.S.C. 2451) and section 141 of the Trade Act of 1974 (19 U.S.C. 2171);

(iii) international trade activities undertaken pursuant to section 3 of the Act of February 14, 1903 (15 U.S.C. 1512), subtitle C of the Export Enhancement Act of 1988, as amended (15 U.S.C. 4721 et seq.), and Reorganization Plan No. 3 of 1979 (19 U.S.C. 2171 note);

(iv) the authorization process for the negotiation and conclusion of international agreements pursuant to 1 U.S.C. 112b(c) and its implementing regulations (22 C.F.R. 181.4) and implementing procedures (11 FAM 720);

(v) activities in connection with subchapter II of chapter 53 of title 31 of the United States Code, title 26 of the United States Code, or Public Law 111-203 and other laws relating to financial regulation; or

(vi) the functions of the Director of OMB relating to budgetary, administrative, or legislative proposals.

(b) This order shall be implemented consistent with applicable law and subject to the availability of appropriations.

(c) This order is not intended to, and does not, create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, enforceable at law or in equity by any party against the United States, its departments, agencies, or entities, its officers, employees, or agents, or any other person.

Note: We are NOT calling for any sort of violent revolution. Violence is what the New World Order wants and will enable them to immediately crush any opposition. We need to be 100% non violent in everything we do. Congress is already moving forward with impeachment proceedings. Any sort of violence now would be harmful for freedom and liberty and should be avoided.

Also, yes there are parts within this executive order that have been in other orders but that does NOT change the fact that there are different parts in this particular executive order that have never been put on paper as well as the fact that this is an UPDATE to a full scale takeover.

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EXECUTIVE ORDER
– – – – – – –
PROMOTING INTERNATIONAL REGULATORY COOPERATION

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, and in order to promote international regulatory cooperation, it is hereby ordered as follows:

Section 1. Policy. Executive Order 13563 of January 18, 2011 (Improving Regulation and Regulatory Review), states that our regulatory system must protect public health, welfare, safety, and our environment while promoting economic growth, innovation, competitiveness, and job creation. In an increasingly global economy, international regulatory cooperation, consistent with domestic law and prerogatives and U.S. trade policy, can be an important means of promoting the goals of Executive Order 13563.

The regulatory approaches taken by foreign governments may differ from those taken by U.S. regulatory agencies to address similar issues. In some cases, the differences between the regulatory approaches of U.S. agencies and those of their foreign counterparts might not be necessary and might impair the ability of American businesses to export and compete internationally. In meeting shared challenges involving health, safety, labor, security, environmental, and other issues, international regulatory cooperation can identify approaches that are at least as protective as those that are or would be adopted in the absence of such cooperation. International regulatory cooperation can also reduce, eliminate, or prevent unnecessary differences in regulatory requirements.

Sec. 2. Coordination of International Regulatory Cooperation. (a) The Regulatory Working Group (Working Group) established by Executive Order 12866 of September 30, 1993 (Regulatory Planning and Review), which was reaffirmed by Executive Order 13563, shall, as appropriate:
(i) serve as a forum to discuss, coordinate, and develop a common understanding among agencies of U.S. Government positions and priorities with respect to:
(A) international regulatory cooperation activities that are reasonably anticipated to lead to significant regulatory actions;
(B) efforts across the Federal Government to support significant, cross-cutting international regulatory cooperation activities, such as the work of regulatory cooperation councils; and

(C) the promotion of good regulatory practices internationally, as well as the promotion of U.S. regulatory approaches, as appropriate; and

(ii) examine, among other things:

(A) appropriate strategies for engaging in the development of regulatory approaches through international regulatory cooperation, particularly in emerging technology areas, when consistent with section 1 of this order;

(B) best practices for international regulatory cooperation with respect to regulatory development, and, where appropriate, information exchange and other regulatory tools; and

(C) factors that agencies should take into account when determining whether and how to consider other regulatory approaches under section 3(d) of this order.

(b) As Chair of the Working Group, the Administrator of the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (OIRA) of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) shall convene the Working Group as necessary to discuss international regulatory cooperation issues as described above, and the Working Group shall include a representative from the Office of the United States Trade Representative and, as appropriate, representatives from other agencies and offices.

(c) The activities of the Working Group, consistent with law, shall not duplicate the efforts of existing interagency bodies and coordination mechanisms. The Working Group shall consult with existing interagency bodies when appropriate.

(d) To inform its discussions, and pursuant to section 4 of Executive Order 12866, the Working Group may commission analytical reports and studies by OIRA, the Administrative Conference of the United States, or any other relevant agency, and the Administrator of OIRA may solicit input, from time to time, from representatives of business, nongovernmental organizations, and the public.

(e) The Working Group shall develop and issue guidelines on the applicability and implementation of sections 2 through 4 of this order.

(f) For purposes of this order, the Working Group shall operate by consensus.

Sec. 3. Responsibilities of Federal Agencies. To the extent permitted by law, and consistent with the principles and requirements of Executive Order 13563 and Executive Order 12866, each agency shall:

(a) if required to submit a Regulatory Plan pursuant to Executive Order 12866, include in that plan a summary of its international regulatory cooperation activities that are reasonably anticipated to lead to significant regulations, with an explanation of how these activities advance the purposes of Executive Order 13563 and this order;

(b) ensure that significant regulations that the agency identifies as having significant international impacts are designated as such in the Unified Agenda of Federal Regulatory and Deregulatory Actions, on RegInfo.gov, and on Regulations.gov;

(c) in selecting which regulations to include in its retrospective review plan, as required by Executive Order 13563, consider:

(i) reforms to existing significant regulations that address unnecessary differences in regulatory requirements between the United States and its major trading partners, consistent with section 1 of this order, when stakeholders provide adequate information to the agency establishing that the differences are unnecessary; and

(ii) such reforms in other circumstances as the agency deems appropriate; and

(d) for significant regulations that the agency identifies as having significant international impacts, consider, to the extent feasible, appropriate, and consistent with law, any regulatory approaches by a foreign government that the United States has agreed to consider under a regulatory cooperation council work plan.

Sec. 4. Definitions. For purposes of this order:

(a) “Agency” means any authority of the United States that is an “agency” under 44 U.S.C. 3502(1), other than those considered to be independent regulatory agencies, as defined in 44 U.S.C. 3502(5).

(b) “International impact” is a direct effect that a proposed or final regulation is expected to have on international trade and investment, or that otherwise may be of significant interest to the trading partners of the United States.

(c) “International regulatory cooperation” refers to a bilateral, regional, or multilateral process, other than processes that are covered by section 6(a)(ii), (iii), and (v) of this order, in which national governments engage in various forms of collaboration and communication with respect to regulations, in particular a process that is reasonably anticipated to lead to the development of significant regulations.

(d) “Regulation” shall have the same meaning as “regulation” or “rule” in section 3(d) of Executive Order 12866.

(e) “Significant regulation” is a proposed or final regulation that constitutes a significant regulatory action.

(f) “Significant regulatory action” shall have the same meaning as in section 3(f) of Executive Order 12866.

Sec. 5. Independent Agencies. Independent regulatory agencies are encouraged to comply with the provisions of this order.

Sec. 6. General Provisions. (a) Nothing in this order shall be construed to impair or otherwise affect:

(i) the authority granted by law to a department or agency, or the head thereof;

(ii) the coordination and development of international trade policy and negotiations pursuant to section 411 of the Trade Agreements Act of 1979 (19 U.S.C. 2451) and section 141 of the Trade Act of 1974 (19 U.S.C. 2171);

(iii) international trade activities undertaken pursuant to section 3 of the Act of February 14, 1903 (15 U.S.C. 1512), subtitle C of the Export Enhancement Act of 1988, as amended (15 U.S.C. 4721 et seq.), and Reorganization Plan No. 3 of 1979 (19 U.S.C. 2171 note);

(iv) the authorization process for the negotiation and conclusion of international agreements pursuant to 1 U.S.C. 112b(c) and its implementing regulations (22 C.F.R. 181.4) and implementing procedures (11 FAM 720);

(v) activities in connection with subchapter II of chapter 53 of title 31 of the United States Code, title 26 of the United States Code, or Public Law 111-203 and other laws relating to financial regulation; or

(vi) the functions of the Director of OMB relating to budgetary, administrative, or legislative proposals.

(b) This order shall be implemented consistent with applicable law and subject to the availability of appropriations.

(c) This order is not intended to, and does not, create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, enforceable at law or in equity by any party against the United States, its departments, agencies, or entities, its officers, employees, or agents, or any other person.

BARACK OBAMA

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Executive Order — Identifying and Reducing Regulatory Burdens

EXECUTIVE ORDER


IDENTIFYING AND REDUCING REGULATORY BURDENS

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, and in order to modernize our regulatory system and to reduce unjustified regulatory burdens and costs, it is hereby ordered as follows:

Section 1. Policy. Regulations play an indispensable role in protecting public health, welfare, safety, and our environment, but they can also impose significant burdens and costs. During challenging economic times, we should be especially careful not to impose unjustified regulatory requirements. For this reason, it is particularly important for agencies to conduct retrospective analyses of existing rules to examine whether they remain justified and whether they should be modified or streamlined in light of changed circumstances, including the rise of new technologies.

Executive Order 13563 of January 18, 2011 (Improving Regulation and Regulatory Review), states that our regulatory system “must measure, and seek to improve, the actual results of regulatory requirements.” To promote this goal, that Executive Order requires agencies not merely to conduct a single exercise, but to engage in “periodic review of existing significant regulations.” Pursuant to section 6(b) of that Executive Order, agencies are required to develop retrospective review plans to review existing significant regulations in order to “determine whether any such regulations should be modified, streamlined, expanded, or repealed.” The purpose of this requirement is to “make the agency’s regulatory program more effective or less burdensome in achieving the regulatory objectives.”

In response to Executive Order 13563, agencies have developed and made available for public comment retrospective review plans that identify over five hundred initiatives. A small fraction of those initiatives, already finalized or formally proposed to the public, are anticipated to eliminate billions of dollars in regulatory costs and tens of millions of hours in annual paperwork burdens. Significantly larger savings are anticipated as the plans are implemented and as action is taken on additional initiatives.

As a matter of longstanding practice and to satisfy statutory obligations, many agencies engaged in periodic review of existing regulations prior to the issuance of Executive Order 13563. But further steps should be taken, consistent with law, agency resources, and regulatory priorities, to promote public participation in retrospective review, to modernize our regulatory system, and to institutionalize regular assessment of significant regulations.

Sec. 2. Public Participation in Retrospective Review. Members of the public, including those directly and indirectly affected by regulations, as well as State, local, and tribal governments, have important information about the actual effects of existing regulations. For this reason, and consistent with Executive Order 13563, agencies shall invite, on a regular basis (to be determined by the agency head in consultation with the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (OIRA)), public suggestions about regulations in need of retrospective review and about appropriate modifications to such regulations. To promote an open exchange of information, retrospective analyses of regulations, including supporting data, shall be released to the public online wherever practicable.

Sec. 3. Setting Priorities. In implementing and improving their retrospective review plans, and in considering retrospective review suggestions from the public, agencies shall give priority, consistent with law, to those initiatives that will produce significant quantifiable monetary savings or significant quantifiable reductions in paperwork burdens while protecting public health, welfare, safety, and our environment. To the extent practicable and permitted by law, agencies shall also give special consideration to initiatives that would reduce unjustified regulatory burdens or simplify or harmonize regulatory requirements imposed on small businesses. Consistent with Executive Order 13563 and Executive Order 12866 of September 30, 1993 (Regulatory Planning and Review), agencies shall give consideration to the cumulative effects of their own regulations, including cumulative burdens, and shall to the extent practicable and consistent with law give priority to reforms that would make significant progress in reducing those burdens while protecting public health, welfare, safety, and our environment.

Sec. 4. Accountability. Agencies shall regularly report on the status of their retrospective review efforts to OIRA. Agency reports should describe progress, anticipated accomplishments, and proposed timelines for relevant actions, with an emphasis on the priorities described in section 3 of this order. Agencies shall submit draft reports to OIRA on September 10, 2012, and on the second Monday of January and July for each year thereafter, unless directed otherwise through subsequent guidance from OIRA. Agencies shall make final reports available to the public within a reasonable period (not to exceed three weeks from the date of submission of draft reports to OIRA).

Sec. 5. General Provisions. (a) For purposes of this order, “agency” means any authority of the United States that is an “agency” under 44 U.S.C. 3502(1), other than those considered to be independent regulatory agencies, as defined in 44 U.S.C. 3502(5).

(b) Nothing in this order shall be construed to impair or otherwise affect:

(i) the authority granted by law to a department or agency, or the head thereof; or

(ii) the functions of the Director of the Office of Management and Budget relating to budgetary, administrative, or legislative proposals.

(c) This order shall be implemented consistent with applicable law and subject to the availability of appropriations.

(d) This order is not intended to, and does not, create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, enforceable at law or in equity by any party against the United States, its departments, agencies, or entities, its officers, employees, or agents, or any other person.

BARACK OBAMA

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Executive Order — Establishing a White House Council on Strong Cities, Strong Communities

EXECUTIVE ORDER

ESTABLISHING A WHITE HOUSE COUNCIL ON STRONG CITIES, STRONG COMMUNITIES

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, and in order to forge a partnership with local communities to provide them with comprehensive technical assistance to use and compete for Federal resources more effectively and efficiently, which will enable them to develop and implement economic strategies to become more competitive, sustainable, and inclusive, it is hereby ordered as follows:

Section 1Policy.  Cities, towns, and regions across our Nation continue to face difficult economic challenges.  Enhancing current Federal assistance is helping to lift communities out of distress.  To allow the Federal Government to better partner with these local communities to build local capacity to address economic issues, and to support comprehensive planning and regional collaboration, my Administration established the Strong Cities, Strong Communities (SC2) pilot initiative.  By partnering with cities and regions to augment their vision for stability and economic growth, the SC2 was designed to help communities strengthen their capacity to create jobs and more competitive business climates, and implement locally driven community and regional planning approaches that lead to sustained economic growth, as well as ensure that Federal assistance is more efficiently provided and used.

This order improves the way the Federal Government engages with and supports local communities by better aligning resources and coordinating efforts across executive departments and agencies (agencies) so that communities across the country have access to comprehensive, localized technical assistance and planning resources to develop and implement their economic vision and strategies.

Sec. 2White House Council on Strong Cities, Strong Communities.  There is established a White House Council on Strong Cities, Strong Communities (Council) within the Department of Housing and Urban Development, to be chaired by the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development and the Assistant to the President for Domestic Policy (Co-Chairs).

(a)  Membership.  In addition to the Co-Chairs, the Council shall consist of the following members:

(i)      the Secretary of the Treasury;

(ii)     the Secretary of Defense;

(iii)    the Attorney General;

(iv)     the Secretary of the Interior;

(v)      the Secretary of Agriculture;

(vi)     the Secretary of Commerce;

(vii)    the Secretary of Labor;

(viii)   the Secretary of Health and Human Services;

(ix)     the Secretary of Transportation;

(x)      the Secretary of Energy;

(xi)     the Secretary of Education;

(xii)    the Secretary of Veterans Affairs;

(xiii)   the Secretary of Homeland Security;

(xiv)    the Chair of the Council of Economic Advisers;

(xv)     the Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency;

(xvi)    the Director of the Office of Management and Budget;

(xvii)   the Administrator of General Services;

(xviii)  the Administrator of the Small Business Administration;

(xix)    the Chief Executive Officer of the Corporation for National and Community Service;

(xx)     the Chairperson of the National Endowment for the Arts;

(xxi)    the Senior Advisor and Assistant to the President for Intergovernmental Affairs and Public Engagement;

(xxii)   the Assistant to the President and Cabinet Secretary;

(xxiii)  the Assistant to the President for Economic Policy;

(xxiv)   the Chair of the Council on Environmental Quality;

(xxv)    the Director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy; and

(xxvi)   the heads of such other agencies and offices as the President may, from time to time, designate.
A member of the Council may designate, to perform the Council functions of the member, a senior level official who is a part of the member’s agency or office, and who is a full time officer or employee of the Federal Government.

(b)  Administration.  The Co Chairs shall convene regular meetings of the Council, determine its agenda, and direct its work.  The Secretary of Housing and Urban Development shall appoint an Executive Director of the Council to coordinate the Council’s activities.  At the direction of the Co Chairs, the Council may establish subgroups consisting exclusively of Council members or their designees, as appropriate.  Agencies may detail staff to the Council to support its coordination and implementation efforts.

Sec. 3Mission and Function of the Council.  The Council shall, to the extent permitted by law, work across agencies and offices to:

(a)  coordinate the development and implementation of the various components of the SC2, as determined by the Co Chairs;

(b)  coordinate agency efforts to ensure communities have access to comprehensive, localized technical assistance and planning resources to develop and execute their economic vision and strategies (including, where appropriate, efforts of existing committees or task forces related to providing technical assistance to local governments and improving their capacity to address economic issues);

(c)  ensure that members of the Council incorporate SC2 implementation efforts into their agency annual performance plans and those efforts’ outcomes into their annual performance results;

(d)  provide recommendations to the President, through the Co Chairs on:

(i)    policies for building local expertise in strengthening local economies;

(ii)   changes to Federal policies and programs to address issues of special importance to cities and local governments that pertain to local capacity and economic growth;

(iii)  implementing best practices from the SC2 initiative Government-wide to better support cities and local governments; and

(iv)   opportunities to increase the flexible utilization of existing Federal program resources across agencies to enable more performance and outcome-based funding;

(e)  encourage the development of technical assistance, planning, and financing tools and implementation strategies that can be coordinated or aligned across agencies to assist communities in building local capacity to address economic issues, engaging in comprehensive planning, and advancing regional collaboration; and

(f)  facilitate the exchange of ideas and strategies to help communities address economic challenges and create sustained economic opportunity.

Sec. 4Outreach.  Consistent with the objectives set forth in this order, the Council, in accordance with applicable law, shall conduct outreach to representatives of nonprofit organizations, businesses, labor organizations, State and local government agencies, school districts, elected officials, faith and other community based organizations, philanthropies, other institutions of local importance, and other interested persons with relevant expertise in the expansion and improvement of efforts to build local capacity to address economic issues in cities and communities.  The Council will convene an annual meeting of interested parties    including mayors and city employees    to share key findings and progress, offer best practices, and promote strategies that have worked in communities participating in the initiative.

Sec. 5Reports.  Within 1 year of the date of this order, and annually thereafter, the Executive Director shall provide a report to the Co Chairs on the work of the Council and its achievements during the year, including demonstrable changes in the capacity of local communities to implement their economic development goals and efforts to achieve more efficient and effective use of Federal resources.

Sec. 6General Provisions.  (a)  The heads of agencies shall assist and provide information to the Council, consistent with applicable law, as may be necessary to implement this order.  Each agency shall bear its own expense for participating in the Council.

(b)  Nothing in this order shall be construed to impair or otherwise affect:

(i)   the authority granted by law to an executive department, agency, or the head thereof; or

(ii)  the functions of the Director of the Office of Management and Budget relating to budgetary, administrative, or legislative proposals.

(c)  This order shall be implemented consistent with applicable law and subject to the availability of appropriations.

(d)  This order is not intended to, and does not, create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, enforceable at law or in equity by any party against the United States, its departments, agencies, or entities, its officers, employees, or agents, or any other person.

BARACK OBAMA

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